Saturday, March 4, 2017

Bits and Pieces


Last month I attended the AWP Conference in Washington DC. I wanted to introduce the world of writers to my new press, Terrapin Books. So signed up for a table in the Book Fair, packed up all the books the press has published in the past year, and drove myself to DC. Three of my poets were there to sign their books. Jessica de Koninck, Patricia Clark, and Christine Stewart-Nunez each had a signing at the table on Friday morning. I also booked a room in the Methodist Church across the street from the Marriott Marquis and on Thursday evening hosted a Terrapin reading there. Each of the three poets read from their books. They were followed by 14 poets from The Doll Collection. I also participated in a panel on small press anthologies. This included four other publishers and was moderated by Lucille Lang Day. Each of us spoke about our press and our anthologies. This was the first time I ever served on an AWP panel. I enjoyed it and wasn't particularly nervous. I sold a bunch of books at the table and met lots of people.


Speaking of anthologies, Terrapin Books has committed to publishing another one. This one will be co-edited by Jason Lee Brown and Shanie Latham. The topic will be donuts! Our submission window at Submittable will open on April 1 and will remain open thru May 31. So think donuts, eat donuts, and write donuts. And check out the Guidelines.


One last thing that I found quite delicious—my poem "For the Love of Avocados" was featured by Ted Kooser on American Life in Poetry, week of February 20. Please pay a visit. The poem is from my most recent poetry book, The Uneaten Carrots of Atonement.  I've also had a lovely new review of my book. It's by Sherry Chandler and appears in Phoebe.

Sunday, February 5, 2017

Heading to AWP

Terrapin Books

On Wednesday I'll be driving to Washington DC to participate in this year's AWP. I haven't been since 2007 when it was in NYC. I thought that one time would suffice for a lifetime, but then I didn't have Terrapin Books. Also, I was invited to be on a panel this year and since I have never served on one, I thought I should give it a try. Then I thought, too, that this would be a good opportunity to introduce my press, some of our books, and some of our poets to the poetry world. So I forged ahead. I have a full schedule.

I'll be driving as I wanted to take the books with me rather than have them shipped. I'll be staying at the conference hotel, the Marriott Marquis. Hideously expensive so it better be nice. It's at least very conveniently attached to the conference center—there's a covered concourse leading from one to the other. Once I arrive on Wednesday, a valet will park my car; I'm not allowed to park it myself. That's $55 per day! Outrageous! Then I can't go into the garage to get anything out of my car—have to have a valet bring the car out and then back in—so I'll have to unload all my stuff when I arrive. I hope I can find someone to help me lug my stuff inside and then up to my room. Books are heavy.

In order to facilitate introducing the press, I booked a table in the Book Fair. I'll be sharing that with Storyscape, a journal. The table is #525T. Come visit and check out our books.

The panel I'm on is on Thursday, 4:30-5:45 PM. It's called "The Independent Press Anthology: Focusing, Editing, Organizing, Designing, Publishing, and Marketing," and will be moderated by Lucille Lang Day. I'm one of five editors/publishers. The others are Wendy Barker, Bryce Milligan, and Claire Ortaldo. Look for us in the Supreme Court Room (level 4), Marriott Marquis Hotel, 901 Massachusetts Ave.

Then I also booked a venue for a Terrapin reading. It was very challenging trying to find a place in DC when I'm in NJ. I found quite a few—but was not willing to pay $1000. Finally, though, I found the Methodist Church, 900 Massachusetts Ave. NW, which is right next door to the hotel. Perfect!  The reading will be on Thursday from 7:00 - 9:00 PM. Three of my poets will first read from their new books:
       Patricia Clark, The Canopy
       Jessica de Koninck, Cutting Room
       Christine Stewart-Nunez, Bluewords Greening
These three poets will be followed by a group reading for The Doll Collection. Poets include Kim Bridgford, Jessica de Koninck, Lori Desrosiers, Roberta Feins, Ann Fisher-Wirth, Kelly Fordon, Alice Friman, Donna Hilbert, Julie Kane, Lori Lamothe, Christina Lovin, Kim Roberts, Hayden Saunier, Enid Shomer, Lauren Goodwin Slaughter, Elaine Terranova, J. C. Todd, Kristin Zimet.
Please join us! Should be fun.

I hope I survive Thursday—very full day.

Friday three poets will have book signings at table #525 as follows:
       Christine Stewart-Nunez, Bluewords Greening, 11:00 - 11:30
       Jessica de Koninck, Cutting Room, 11:30 - 12:00
       Patricia Clark, The Canopy, 12:00 - 12:30

Please stop by, get a book, and have it signed.

Tuesday, January 24, 2017

Last Chance to Submit Your Poetry Manuscript



Our open reading period will close end of day on Tuesday, January 31, so if you're planning to submit, the time is now. There will be no deadline extension. We have some really fine manuscripts already, but would love to see your work, too. We plan to accept 2-4 manuscripts.

We charge a minimal reading fee of $12 to help defray costs. We carefully edit each accepted manuscript, work closely with each poet, and do not forget about you once your book is in print. We do a bit of advertising and make efforts to get a readership for your book. We pride ourselves on our responsiveness to questions and concerns.

We are also committed to getting books into print within a reasonable amount of time. We do not keep a backlog but accept only a limited number of manuscripts during each open reading period. We then put out those books before we again open for submissions. So far we've been able to get accepted manuscripts out within 6 months or less.

We provide each poet with 15 review copies, offer additional copies at a substantial discount, and pay a royalty fee each year.

We have thus far published books by Neil Carpathios, Lynne Knight, Jessica de Koninck, Christine Stewart-Nunez, Patricia Clark, and Carolyn Miller. Our titles have been receiving wonderful attention and praise from such places as Verse Daily, Poetry Daily, The Missouri Review, and the Washington Independent Review of Books.

Please carefully review and follow our Guidelines. And read our FAQs.

We look forward to reading your work.

Tuesday, January 10, 2017

Print Journals That Accept Online Submissions



It's been more than a year since I last updated the list of print journals that accept online submissions. This list includes 7 additions. I expect that before too long all print journals will be accepting online submissions; most do already. I've deleted information about fees as a submission fee seems to be the norm these day. Many submitters feel that a small fee is worth it as it saves paper, stamps, and a trip to the post office.

Journals new to the list (not necessarily new journals) are indicated with a double asterisk. 


The number of issues per year appears after the journal's name.


The reading period for each journal appears at the end of each entry.


Unless noted otherwise, the journal accepts simultaneous submissions.

As always, please let me know if you find any errors here. And good luck.



Adanna: a journal about women, for women—1x
Jan 31 - April 30

Agni—2x
Sept 1 - May 31

February 1 - May 31

all year


Apogee—2x
two submission periods—check website

**Arcadia Magazine—4x
Sept 1 - April 30

**Atlanta Review—2x
all year

check website to see if open for poetry submissions

June 1 - November 15

Bateau—2x
all year

Bayou—2x
Sept 1-June 1

all year

Sept 15-Dec 15

all year
no sim

all year

Sept 15 - May 15

Boulevard—3x
November 1-April 30 

Breakwater Review—2x
November 15 for the January issue;
April 15 for the June issue

Burnside Review—every 9 months

Caesura—2x
August 5 - Oct. 5

Caketrain—1x
all year

Carbon Copy Magazine—2x
May 1st through September 1st, November 1st through March

The Carolina Quarterly—3x       
all year

Cimarron Review—4x
all year

The Cincinnati Review—2x
Sept 1 - May 31

Columbia—2x
September 1 - May 1

The Conium Review—2x
Jan 1-April 1

August 15-October 15 
January 31-March 31

The Cossack Review—3x
All year

Crab Creek Review—2x
Sept 15 - March 31

all year

August 1 to November 1
December 1 to April 1

CutBank—1-2x
October 1 thru February 15

Ecotone—2x
August 15–April 15

all year

Fence—2x
check website to see if open for submissions

FIELD—2x
all year
no sim

no Jan, Feb, June, or July

August thru May

Fourteen Hills—2x
September 1 to January 1
March 1 to July 1

The Fourth River—1x
July 1-Sept 1

The Frank Martin Review—1x
all year

Gargoyle—1x
reads month of June

**The Georgia Review
August 16 - May 14
 
The Greensboro Review
—2x   
September 15 deadline for the Spring issue
February 15 deadline for the Fall issue

Grist—1x
August 15 - April 15

All year

deadlines: Winter issue: November 15
Summer issue: April 15

Hartskill Review—3x
all year

Sept 1 - May 31

Aug 1 - Oct 1

All year
pays

Sept 1 - Dec. 15

all year

The Idaho Review—1x
Sept. 1 to April 15

rolling for 3-4 weeks at a time
check website for dates

Jubilat—2x
September 1 - May 1

September 15 - January 15
no sim
check website for submission dates

The Laurel Review—1x
Sept 1-May 1

The Lindenwood Review—1x
Jul 15-Dec 15

The Literary Review—4x
Sept 30-May 31

Little Patuxent Review—2x
submission period varies—check website

Submit to Poetry Editor: lareview.poetry@gmail.com
Sept 1 - Dec 1

all year

Lumina—1x
August 1 - Nov 15

all year

Mantis—1x
currently open for submissions
Send all poems to: mantispoetry@gmail.com

October 1 - April 30

Measure—2x
no sim
all year

July 15 - Sept. 30

Meridian—2x ($2 fee)
all year

all year

August 1–November 1 
January 1–April 1

all year

The Mom Egg—1x
June 1- Sept. 1

December, January, and February only or all year if a subscriber
August 1-May 1

for the Summer issue January 1 through March 1
for the Winter issue July 1 through September 1 (contest only)

no sim
Sept 1-May 31

August 15 - November 1

Sept-May (summer okay for subscribers)

Aug 15 - May 1

New South—2x
all year

weekly magazine
all year

September 1 - April 30

September 1-December 1 
January 15-April 15

**Off the Coast—4x
all year

Parcel—2x
all year

Jan 1- May 1 (but on hiatus for 2012)

Phoebe—1 print issue, 1 online
March 9 - Oct 31

Pleiades—2x
August 15-May 15

June 1 - Jan. 15

PMS—1x
Jan 1 thru March 31
(women only)

**Poet Lore—2x
all year

Poetry—11x
year round
no sim

September 15 - April 15

February 1 to April 1 for the winter issue
June 1 to August 1 for the spring issue

Sept 1-May 1

Prairie Schooner—4x
Sept 1 - May 1
no sim

September 15 - March 31

Quiddity—2x
all year

all year
considers previously published

All year

Rattle—2x
year round

year round

Redivider—2x
all year

No June, July, August, or December
no sim

Rhino—1x
April 1 - Oct 1

Sept. 15 through Jan. 15

Rosebud—3x
All year

year round

Salmagundi—4x
February 1—April 15

Salt Hill—2x
August 1 - April 1

Jan 1 - Feb 1 / July 1-Aug 1

Saw Palm
1x
July 1- October 1

**Sierra Nevada Review—1x
Sept - mid-Feb
Feb. 1 - April 1
January 1 - March 1

All year

All year

August 15-October 15 for the Spring issue
January 1-March 15 for the Fall issue

All year

All year

**Southern Poetry Review—2x
all year

The Southampton Review—2x
September 1 to December 1 and from March 1 to June 1

All year

Southern Indiana Review—2x
Sept 1-April 30

No June, July, August

August 15 - May 15

Sept 15 - May 15
No Sim

Spoon River Poetry Review—2x
September 15 to February 15

Sept 1-Dec 15
September 1 - April 15
No Sim       

All year

Sept 1 - Dec. 31
no sim


Sept 15 - Nov. 1
no sim

Sept 15 - April 30

32 poems—2x
via email
all year

The Threepenny Review—4x
      
Jan 1 - June 30

Tiferet—1x
Sept  - December

September 1 - May 31

Upstreet—1x
Sept 1 - March 1

Versal—1x
Sept 15 - Jan 15

All year

August 1 - Oct 15
Dec 15 – Feb 1

April 15 - July 31

Aug 15 - April 15

all year

all year  

Yemassee—2x        
All year


Tuesday, December 27, 2016

Terrapin Books: The Year in Review



  
First, I want to let you know that Terrapin Books will open for submissions of full-length poetry manuscripts on Sunday, January 1, and will remain open thru Tuesday, January 31. Please carefully read and follow the Guidelines. Also be sure to read our new FAQs; hopefully, any questions you might have will be answered there. If not, then use the Contact form or email address and ask your question. I will quickly respond. I look forward to reading some great submissions.

The press celebrated its first birthday in October. We are very proud of the books we’ve published in our first year. They include the following titles, each linked to its page at the website:

One Anthology:
The Doll Collection, including 89 poems by 88 poets such as Alice Friman, Kelly Cherry, Richard Garcia, and Jeffrey Harrison.


Six Poetry Books:
Confessions of a Captured Angel, by Neil Carpathios

The Persistence of Longing, by Lynne Knight

Cutting Room, by Jessica de Koninck

Bluewords Greening, by Christine Stewart-Nunez

The Canopy, by Patricia Clark

Route 66 and Its Sorrows (forthcoming very soon), by Carolyn Miller


Two Craft Books:
The Crafty Poet: A Portable Workshop, revised edition, edited by Diane Lockward
The Crafty Poet II: A Portable Workshop, edited by Diane Lockward


For more information about any of the above titles, please visit the website page.


We are thrilled by the attention and appreciation that titles from Terrapin Books have received thus far. We hate to brag, but can’t help ourselves. Here’s what we’re bragging about:

3 Verse Daily features
1 Poetry Daily feature
1 Missouri Review online feature
3 reviews in the Washington Independent Review of Books
1 poet featured at the South Dakota Poetry Festival
1 poet featured at the College English Association National Conference in Hilton Head, NC (March)
6 Pushcart Prize nominations (and hoping for a win)

And as if all that weren't enough, Terrapin Books will make its first appearance at AWP in February with a table in the Book Fair, a reading on Thursday evening featuring three of our poets with new books along with a group of poets from The Doll Collection, and 3 book signings. But more about that next time.


Friday, December 23, 2016

Yes, Virginia


Each Christmas I like to revisit the following essay from the The Sun. My grandmother read it to me many years ago. I've always remembered it. If you don't already know this piece, I hope you'll enjoy it. I also hope you'll have a Merry Christmas if that's what you're celebrating. And I hope you'll have a wonderful New Year. Thank you for being a Blogalicious reader.

Eight-year-old Virginia O'Hanlon wrote a letter to the editor of New York's The Sun, and the quick response was printed as an unsigned editorial on September 21, 1897. The work of veteran newsman Francis Pharcellus Church has since become history's most reprinted newspaper editorial, appearing in part or whole in dozens of languages in books, movies, and other editorials, and on posters and stamps.


Here's Virginia's letter:

"DEAR EDITOR: I am 8 years old.
"Some of my little friends say there is no Santa Claus.
"Papa says, 'If you see it in THE SUN it's so.'
"Please tell me the truth; is there a Santa Claus?

"VIRGINIA O'HANLON.
"115 WEST NINETY-FIFTH STREET."


Here's the reply:

VIRGINIA, your little friends are wrong. They have been affected by the skepticism of a skeptical age. They do not believe except what they see. They think that nothing can be which is not comprehensible by their little minds. All minds, Virginia, whether they be men's or children's, are little. In this great universe of ours man is a mere insect, an ant, in his intellect, as compared with the boundless world about him, as measured by the intelligence capable of grasping the whole of truth and knowledge.

Yes, VIRGINIA, there is a Santa Claus. He exists as certainly as love and generosity and devotion exist, and you know that they abound and give to your life its highest beauty and joy. Alas! how dreary would be the world if there were no Santa Claus. It would be as dreary as if there were no VIRGINIAS. There would be no childlike faith then, no poetry, no romance to make tolerable this existence. We should have no enjoyment, except in sense and sight. The eternal light with which childhood fills the world would be extinguished.

Not believe in Santa Claus! You might as well not believe in fairies! You might get your papa to hire men to watch in all the chimneys on Christmas Eve to catch Santa Claus, but even if they did not see Santa Claus coming down, what would that prove? Nobody sees Santa Claus, but that is no sign that there is no Santa Claus. The most real things in the world are those that neither children nor men can see. Did you ever see fairies dancing on the lawn? Of course not, but that's no proof that they are not there. Nobody can conceive or imagine all the wonders there are unseen and unseeable in the world.

You may tear apart the baby's rattle and see what makes the noise inside, but there is a veil covering the unseen world which not the strongest man, nor even the united strength of all the strongest men that ever lived, could tear apart. Only faith, fancy, poetry, love, romance, can push aside that curtain and view and picture the supernal beauty and glory beyond. Is it all real? Ah, VIRGINIA, in all this world there is nothing else real and abiding.

No Santa Claus! Thank God! he lives, and he lives forever. A thousand years from now, Virginia, nay, ten times ten thousand years from now, he will continue to make glad the heart of childhood.


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